Navigating Holiday Entitlements and Employment Law for Workers on Coronation Day

As the nprepares for the upcoming Coronation Day, many employees are left wondering whether they are entitled to a day off or not. The issue of employment law and holiday entitlement has become a topic of concern for many employees, especially with the uncertainties surrounding the pandemic. To address this concern, EuStartUp.news reached out to Christopher Hitchins, employment partner at Katten UK LLP, to provide clarity on this matter.

Key Takeaways:

  • All employees are entitled to a minimum of 28 days’ holiday, including bank and public holidays.
  • Whether or not employees get a day off on Coronation Day depends on the wording in their employment contract.
  • If an employee does not have an employment contract, they are entitled to a minimum of 28 days’ holiday and can request to take holiday or the employer can require them to take holiday on a particular day.

Understanding Employee Entitlements for Public and Bank Holidays

There are several public and bank holidays throughout the year, including New Year’s Day, Family Day, Good Friday, Victoria Day, Labour Day, Thanksgiving Day, Remembrance Day, Christmas Day, and Boxing Day. On these days, employees may be entitled to a day off, depending on the wording in their employment contract.

According to Christopher Hitchins, all employees are entitled to a minimum of 28 days’ holiday, which can include public and bank holidays. However, the wording of an employee’s contract determines whether or not they are entitled to a day off on Coronation Day. Some contracts may entitle employees to “the usual” bank and public holidays, which may not include Coronation Day. On the other hand, some contracts may entitle employees to “bank and public holidays each year,” which would include Coronation Day.

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It is important to note that if an employee does not have an employment contract, they are still entitled to a minimum of 28 days’ holiday, which can include public and bank holidays. Employers may require their employees to take their holiday on a particular day or allow employees to request a day off, given the relevant period of notice.

Legal Obligations for Employers and Employees

Employers have a legal obligation to provide their employees with a minimum of 28 days’ holiday, including public and bank holidays. However, the wording of an employee’s contract may entitle them to more holiday each year. Employers must ensure that their contracts are clear and unambiguous to avoid any misunderstandings.

If an employee is entitled to a day off on Coronation Day and their employer fails to grant them this day off, the employer may be in breach of the employment contract. This can result in legal action being taken against the employer, which can be costly in terms of time and money.

Employees also have a legal obligation to adhere to their employment contract, which includes taking their holiday entitlements within the specified period. Failure to do so can result in disciplinary action being taken against the employee.

Tips for Employees

Employees who are unsure of their holiday entitlements should consult their employment contract or speak with their employer for clarification. If an employee believes that they are entitled to a day off on Coronation Day and their employer refuses to grant them this day off, they should seek legal advice.

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Employees should also ensure that they take their holiday entitlements within the specified period to avoid any disciplinary action being taken against them. If an employee is unable to take their holiday entitlements due to work demands, they should speak with their employer to find a solution that works for both parties.

Tips for Employers

Employers should ensure that their employment contracts are clear and unambiguous to avoid any misunderstandings. Employers should also ensure that they adhere to their legal

obligations to provide their employees with a minimum of 28 days’ holiday, including public and bank holidays. Failure to do so can result in legal action being taken against the employer.

If an employer receives a request from an employee to take a day off on Coronation Day, they should review the employee’s contract to determine whether or not they are entitled to this day off. If the employee is entitled to a day off, the employer should grant them this day off to avoid any legal action being taken against them.

Employers should also ensure that their employees take their holiday entitlements within the specified period to avoid any issues with employee retention or productivity. Employers should make it clear to their employees how to request time off and ensure that the process is fair and consistent for all employees.

Conclusion

In conclusion, employees in are entitled to a minimum of 28 days’ holiday, including public and bank holidays. Whether or not employees are entitled to a day off on Coronation Day depends on the wording in their employment contract. Employers have a legal obligation to provide their employees with a minimum of 28 days’ holiday, including public and bank holidays, and failure to do so can result in legal action being taken against the employer.

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